OMG

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Oil on Canvas 12″x12″   Alla Prima

In this piece, I’ve mixed mindful linear accents with an even focus of hues and values.

I’m working furiously at the moment, so please forgive my lack of attention (for the time being), to all of your terrific blogs.  I’ll move back into blogger mode soon and enjoy catching up with you.  I so appreciate you insightful comments and kind support. Thank you!

Linear Arrangements

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11″x14″ Charcoal, Oil on Canvas

I rarely focus on line when I paint.  Instead, I most often concentrate on seeing and representing values in their various shapes and hues.  But, I’m forever looking for ways to change up my point of view.  This painting is a result of one of those change-ups.

Elusive

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Acrylic and oil on canvas 18″x24″

For this piece, I followed the same procedure as  “Active Resolve” .   I’m finding it a satisfying process, at least for the moment;)

Exhibeo Honorable Mention

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A welcome surprise, “Betsy” won Honorable Mention in The Human Figure competition at  Exhibeo Art Competition Magazine.  In addition, Jonathan Raddatz, from Exhibeo has written a lovely review  of my “Young Series”, in which “Betsey” is a part. You can find the review  here.

Thank you, Jonathan and thank you, Exhibeo!

The Depot

bround copyOil on 17.5″ wood panel

While shopping at Home Depot, I spotted a wooden disk that I had to have. While it’s ridiculously heavy and I have no idea what it was created for, it served as a terrific surface for this painting. I think I’ll pick up another panel next time I’m at the Depot.

Christmas Past and Present

 

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*Many of you will remember my husband’s tradition of saving  the stump of our family’s Christmas tree every year, and carving it into the form of a creature.  Each creature represents  a sustaining memory of something significant to us in that year.  When he has completed the carving, he cleverly inserts a penny with the year’s date into the bottom of each little sculpture, to document its year.*    

The painting above is a still life of some of his creatures, that I painted as a gift for him.

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This year’s carving honors the memory of Lillith, our beloved feline hellion .  She recently passed on at nearly twenty- one years of age. We miss her very much. 

Below is sampling of  carvings from years past.  So far he has created one piece for every Christmas  we’ve been married-thirty one in all.

                                                                       From our family to yours, we wish you  a wonderful Holiday Season and a creative New Year.  
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Active Resolve

bAndrew copy                                                     Acrylic, Oil, Graphite on Canvas  18″x24″

My handsome model’s presence and a challenge from my son, inspired a painting whose kinetic energy moves directly forward,  from movement to quiet resolution.  Articulating that movement required an  approach that differed from my usual.

I began with an energetic acrylic abstract painting.   Over top of the acrylic, I drew my subject with willow charcoal. To prevent the painting from becoming too muddy, I sprayed the drawing down with “SpectraFix” (a much healthier fixative to work with than the alternatives).  I proceeded with a very quick and incomplete grisaille underpainting of the figure, and then began painting in oil with color.  Over top, I played with oil sticks and pencil.

I’ve got to tell you that I really enjoyed the spontaneity of this process.  I found the energy to be contagious.  More paintings are in the works, experimenting with the same procedure.

 

Sweet and Wild

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A tribute to a sweet little wild bunny.

When she was quite small, she managed not only to survive four curious cats, a trip through the kitty door (which seriously scraped the fur and skin off  her back), a harrowing escape through the living room, then out the front door. Weeks later, she took up residence in our front yard. She was clearly the same little rabbit, because of the reverse mohawk on her back, which (we were relieved to see), healed very nicely. She seemed familiar with us, the frantic humans from the house who expedited her getaway. On several occasions, she allowed us to approach, and was so relaxed in our presence, that she settled down a couple of feet away and bathed like a cat,taking time to thoroughly groom.

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We haven’t seen her for a while. We’re hoping that she is safe, and is more wary of  the dangers of cats and cars and humans. Hoping even more, that her curious and trusting nature didn’t lead her into another disaster, like a suburban Peter Rabbit.

We’ll be watching out for her this  winter, ready with some extra bunny nutrition to help her through the coming snow storms. Ironically however, it would be better  if she didn’t return. Better if  her survival instincts took her a few blocks over to the river,where it’s a little more wild and a possibly a little bit safer.

 

 

Shadow Portrait

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“Shadow portrait” Oil on Canvas 16″x20″

Hands are so very unique to the individual and so expressive, that they can rival portraits of facial features  This painting happened pretty quickly.  I found  painting it as satisfying as painting any other sort of portrait. The masking tape was fun to paint as well;)

Universal

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Oil, cold wax on canvas 32″x48″

Newest in the  “Blood and Vapor” Series:Who lingers within you?   Have you ever felt an ancestral presence?  The inescapable tie of family:hundreds of individuals, yesterday and today, here and gone.  A powerful resonance or inconspicuous vapor?

All of us; humbled and glorious, simply human.

Breathing Easier

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Portrait of R         12″x12″ Oil on Canvas

For those of you working in traditional oil paint and solvents, this experiment might be of interest to you.  For this painting I used the least toxic solvent and medium  I know of: Weber’s Turpenoid Natural and Liquiglaze Natural. They work!  The upside is breathing a lot easier. The downside is a gloppy and heavier feel to the paint.  My brushstrokes are visible, which for this painting, is just fine. The Liquiglaze does speed drying time and does respond as other glaze mediums but, not quite as well (in my opinion), if one is interested in a smoother and multi layered glaze.  I have not mixed these “natural’ products with their more toxic cousins.  And I probably won’t take my experimenting that far. Right now, I am reserving the “naturals” for projects that seem simpatico with their effects and what I’m trying to achieve.  Perhaps with more practice I will be able to do myself and the planet a favor and use the “naturals” exclusively.  BTW, Turpenoid Natural is fantastic for cleaning and conditioning brushes!

Other projects however, do demand Gamsol or Turpenoid and galkyd glaze mediums.  I have however, just purchased a tube of Gamblin’s solvent-free gel.  I’ll let you know how that works for me  when I give it a go.

Does anyone  have any experience or opinions on the efficacy of the “natural” less toxic products?

Waking

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12″x12″ oil on canvas

I’ve been weighing thicker and looser oil painting technique against thinner and more exacting.  The former seems to push my color intensity to match the density of the paint. Despite the thick paint, I’ve glazed in places, joining a technique I’ve used only with thin layers, with a near impasto. A wake-up for my senses, or at least a new passage and practice.

 

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